Animal Aid

Overview of the wildlife campaign

Alien species

To prevent alien species escaping or being dumped, the root cause of the problem must be addressed: the importing of non-native species for the pet trade, zoos or other animal collections. Non-native animals compete with others for resources. They may mate with native animals creating ‘hybrids’, which conservationists believe pollute the purity of the species, and, they say, must therefore be eradicated.

Animals under threat

'Pest' species

Animals are frequently used as scapegoats to cover up the vices of human beings. Supposed problems are invented or exaggerated and the real root of any problem remains ignored. Habitat destruction and persecution by humans caused the red squirrel population to dive but the grey squirrel is blamed; human’s waste-creating habits encourage rat, fox and pigeon populations to soar but we kill the animals rather than clean up after ourselves; foxes are blamed for the deaths of starving, freezing and neglected sheep and lambs, giving those with the desire for bloody ‘sport’ an excuse to kill them.

Ruddy madness!

Conservationists who advocate wildlife ‘culls’ show little, if any, regard for the welfare of individual animals, concentrating instead on the survival and purity of a species in general.

The ruddy duck is being targeted in a national extermination programme licensed by the Department for the Environment, Farming and Rural Affairs (Defra) because it is said that the birds are mating with a close genetic kin, the white headed duck, and producing an ‘impure hybrid’. In other words, they are being slaughtered in the name of blood purity. Shockingly, this campaign is being orchestrated principally by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds!

Pest control companies are fully aware that culling is ineffective 
              but they continue to recommend this option because it ensures that 
              they will be offered a lucrative long-term contract.

Stop killing squirrels!

Grey squirrels are being blamed for a decrease in the numbers of red squirrels. But red squirrels were already in decline before the grey was introduced around 130 years ago as an ornamental species. The greys have flourished because they have been better able to adapt than the red. They are more sturdy, opportunistic and faster at breeding. And, surely, a squirrel is a squirrel is a squirrel. Is the colour of their fur really an excuse for killing the grey ones?

Badger

Don't blame the badgers!

At the close of 1998, the Government began a badger ‘research programme’, which, over the next five years, resulted in the trapping and destruction of around 20,000 badgers. The killing of these animals - supposedly a protected species - took place because farmers blame badgers for the escalating incidence of tuberculosis in their beef and dairy herds. However, there is , and never was, any convincing evidence proving the link.

Poor pigeons!

Labelled 'vermin' and frequently referred to as 'rats with wings', we are told that pigeons carry up to 60 diseases and pose a potential health risk to human beings. What we are not told, however, is that all wild birds carry these diseases and pigeons pose no greater threat than the average garden bird. Additionally, where pigeon numbers are regarded - by intolerant people - as 'too high', killing them will not solve the supposed 'problem' anyway, it will actually cause numbers to go up.

Save The Trafalgar Square Pigeons!

For generations, Trafalgar Square's pigeons were fed by tourists from around the world who bought pigeon food from a licensed seller located on the Square. In autumn 2000, London Mayor Ken Livingstone declared war on the pigeons, pledging to rid the Square of its most famous attraction. He ordered the Greater London Authority (GLA) to withdraw the license from the feed seller. A public outcry followed as the 4,000 or so birds on the Square faced the prospect of death by starvation. A number of concerned groups and individuals came together to form what became Save the Trafalgar Square Pigeons to prevent this from happening.

Unwanted visitors

Insect and rodent infestation problems are largely the result of human carelessness and are therefore, preventable. But a multi-million pound industry has developed that inflates and excites people’s animal-related fears and prejudices. With the help of this factfile, and a little patience, you should soon be able to have your home to yourself again whilst maintaining a guilt-free conscience!

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